Three or four questions

Alex Salmond is doubtless correct to say that the grotesque anomaly of being an energy-rich nation that gets poorer during a time of energy supply pressures is the “biggest single economic and social issue linked to the constitutional question since the poll tax”. Although I might have said since Brexit. I would, however, question whether it is “going to be a breakthrough for the independence movement”, as Mr Salmond also opines. It certainly has the potential to be such a breakthrough. But the history of Nicola Sturgeon’s incumbency is one long sad saga of missed opportunities, wasted time and squandered potential. There is no reason to believe the SNP/Scottish Government will effectively exploit the situation for the benefit of Scotland’s cause.

What I would like to hear from Alex Salmond is some detail on how he thinks Alba Party can make a difference. Firstly, how his party hopes to force or persuade the SNP/Scottish Government to make better use of the opportunity presented by the energy crisis to further the cause of restoring Scotland’s independence. Taking a few council seats isn’t going to do it. To suggest that it might is just vacuous electioneering. Nicola Sturgeon is not so easily panicked. So, what other cards is Mr Salmond claiming to have up his sleeve?

Secondly, I’d like to hear Alex Salmond’s ideas on how the situation could be made a “breakthrough for the independence movement”. How would he go about propagandising the grotesque anomaly referred to earlier? What would be Alba Party’s message?

Thirdly, I’d like to hear how Alex Salmond proposes we proceed should the independence movement achieve the breakthrough he speaks of. We have some idea of Nicola Sturgeon’s ‘strategy’. Enough of an idea to give rise to very serious concerns that if anything at all is delivered in 2023 as promised it will not be the decisive, conclusive exercise of our right of self-determination that Scotland so desperately needs and to which we have an absolute and inalienable right.

What little I’ve been able to glean regarding Alba Party’s thinking on the process by which Scotland’s independence will be restored strongly suggests that it differs from the SNP in no significant way. Supposing Alba Party could exert any influence on Nicola Sturgeon, what would they be demanding that she do?

Were I to be permitted a fourth question it would not be for Alex Salmond. Rather, I’d like to ask The National why the other three questions were not asked.



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4 thoughts on “Three or four questions

  1. I don’t need to tell you this but challengers never win elections, instead its the incumbents that lose them. In that light simply posing the questions are enough to trigger a voting decision. Still, it would be better if there was more detail on hand and parties were afforded more time and space to lay out why the challenger will be any better.

    Unfortunately everything from electoral districts to the presentational politics that masquerade as party debates follow the American model for gerrymandering to make it harder and harder to tuff out the incumbents (of the main parties). Coke or Pepsi, anyone?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. UKIP & Brexit Party never succeeded in having any MPs elected, they were probably told by wise political pundits that winning a few council seats wouldn’t cut it. Here we are, out of the EU.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. UKIP did much more than win a few Council seats. They won many (Tory) Council Seats AND actually won a UK European Election. They succeeded in putting a knife to the Tory Govt’s throat. Alba have not come close to even acquiring a blade, much less finding a way to use it. Alba need to stop trying to bring the pro-Indy Govt down and concentrate on finding ways to influence it instead. You don’t do that by shouting “traitor”, “zealot” and worse at them. As one wise voice once said; “you can’t piss on some one’s picnic and then expect to be invited round to tea”.

      Like

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