Precious to whom?

Yet the most devastating finding in today’s new poll is that people in England identifying as Conservative supporters are evenly split on the subject with 49% saying they support independence against 51% who were opposed.

Nearly half of Tory voters in England back English independence, poll finds

Think about it! If almost half of voters in England want to see an end to the Union then this is likely to be true also of English people living and voting in Scotland – at least to some extent. An approach to the constitutional issue which framed it as a campaign to end the Union – effectively restoring the independence of both countries – is likely to appeal to more of those people than a campaign which is presented as being all about getting something for Scotland. Especially when that something is portrayed as negatively as Scottish independence is by the British media.

Scotland’s cause may have been to some degree anti-English historically. But for a handful of holdouts who imagine history to have a rewind and pause function, it has not been about ‘the English’ for many decades.The modern independence movement is not concerned with the ancient animosities which poisoned the relationship between our two nations. Scotland’s cause experienced a reformation in the 20th century and our modern civic nationalism is concerned only with building a new relationship between Scotland and England. A relationship informed by 21st century democracy rather than one derived from archaic political, social and economic thinking.

More and more people are recognising that the Union is an obstacle to achieving that new relationship. More and more people in both our nations are realising that the Union is ‘precious’ only to a pustule of privilege within a relatively small constituency which pines for a world to which they cannot return any more than that handful of holdouts who refuse to accept that “Those days are past now; and in the past they must remain,”. Or that when Scotland does “rise again” it will not be a Scotland of warlike and warring clansmen, but as a Scotland capable of preserving the best of its traditions while casting off the worst of its old arrangements. A Scotland still holding to core principles, but happy to abandon outmoded practices.

Scotland will be transformed by the restoration of our independence. But the same is true for England. The England of today is as much a product and function of the archaic, asymmetric and anti-democratic Union as is Scotland. Both nations have been shaped by the increasing toxic relationship fostered by a political union forged, not in friendship and trust but in enmity and suspicion. A political union devised exclusively for the purposes of the privileged few and at whatever cost to the many who have been stripped of their power by just such devices as the Union. The Union which is ‘precious’ only to those intent on maintaining the structures of power, privilege and patronage which underpin and sustain an elite which today wears the face of Boris Johnson and which promises tomorrow to wear something even uglier.

As much as it is time to end Scotland’s status as the annexed territory of our southern neighbour it is time to relieve England of its status as the political and economic plaything of a decadent and decaying elite.

To this highly appealing end, we must rethink our whole approach to the constitutional issue in Scotland. We must reshape the mindset which bids us petition for that which we need only assert. We must reframe the constitutional question as frank, honest and penetrating scrutiny of the Union rather than a test of Scotland’s fitness for something that is ours as a nation as much as sovereignty is the inalienable possession of the individual. Framed thus, constitutional normalisation can be shown to serve not only the citizens of both Scotland and England-as-Britain but democracy itself.



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8 thoughts on “Precious to whom?

  1. There are probably some recent break-up that could be instructive. I happened to watch this just the other day :

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  2. Great post, Peter! I disagree with you about one thing. “it is time to relieve England of its status as the political and economic plaything of a decadent and decaying elite.” We can should certainly wish that the English people will relieve themselves of the status of being “the political and economic plaything of a decadent and decaying elite.” It is not our responsibility, however, to relieve them of it. To try to do so would be like Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP mandarins trying to save England from Brexit. It would not be welcome. We can and should encourage them in their aspiration for independence, and wish them well. We do want to be agreeable neighbours to the English.

    If the English people continue to elect the English parties that they now elect, then they will continue to be, “the political and economic plaything of a decadent and decaying elite.” Unless there is a revolution in that country, I hope a bloodless revolution, there will be no change there.

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    1. That was poorly worded. You are quite correct. What I intended to convey was that ending the Union will be as much an opportunity for renewal in England as in Scotland. I think many of us hope it might once again open up a space for the kind of progressive politics that has survived relatively well in Scotland while being all but totally excluded from political discourse in England.

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  3. I agree with your thoughts here Peter. A new channel to talk to English people and some Brit Nats.
    Thanks

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